Frizzy

Frizz is a very puffed-up little Frizzle rooster.  Here he is . . .

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Flapping his wings (he has hardly any wing feathers).


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With Griffin (a Silver Leghorn hen).


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Crowing.


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Eating grass.


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Close-up.


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As a young cockerel.


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Tick-Tock, Beaky, Duchess, and Clover

Tick-Tock, Beaky, Duchess, and Clover are Dutch Bantams.  They’re very pretty and sweet–and tiny.  Tick-Tock, the rooster, has an extremely shrill crow, but he doesn’t crow much except for when he sees the other rooster, Frizzy.  When it snowed for the first time this year, they didn’t like it.  They went back in their coop and wouldn’t come out for the rest of the day.

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Tick-Tock.

Duchess, a blue cream light brown hen.

Tick-Tock, Clover, and Duchess, with Beaky in front.  Tick-Tock is crowing.  The cardboard taped to the front of the coop was there to make the doorway smaller.

Feeding Horses: What Is a Forage?

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Pasture, or grass, is a forage.

Forages contain a high crude-fiber content.  In general, a forage would be grass or hay.  Horses should be fed to horses because they provide nutrients.  But they don’t do just that.  Forage keeps up the muscle tone in the GI tract and provides horses with something to do.  Without forage, horses can develop bad habits such as stall weaving and wood-chewing.

According to Feeding and Care of the Horse, forages have the following characteristics:

They are bulky.

They high in fiber and low in digestible energy.

Forages are high in calcium and potassium and low in phosphorous. 

Sun-cured hays are higher in vitamins E, A, and K.

Vary in protein content.

Horses should have access to pasture in moderation.  But hay can be fed in larger amounts.  It is recommended that horses be fed many small meals throughout the day or else get their hay in a slow feeder to make it last longer.  This simulates natural grazing activity.

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Hay should be fed in little bits to mimic natural grazing.

2015 Chicks

After forgetting about this blog for 2.5 years, I have decided to start writing on it again.  This year’s chicks are Puffin, Spicy, Della, Fluffy Tail, Griffin, Icy, and Ivy.  The first batch of five chicks we raised in a brooder.  The last two, Puffy and Spicy, are being raised by a hen.


To see more chicken photos, please visit: http://www.bigthingscoop.com/


 

Puffy and Spicy with Black Beak.

Left to right: Della, Griffin, Icy, and Ivy.  Fluffy Tail is not in the picture.

Starlight Song

It was upon a starlit night

a bird set out to see the sights

to travel the world — near and far

more specifically, to map the stars

in the beginning of firefly June,

it was the time to admire the moon

late in the summer month of July

said the swallow,’Let us travel the sky’

so, off he flew, higher and higher

in his mind, just one desire

to touch a star, to hear it sing

feel the melody, take to the wing

High above the atmosphere

melodies drifted clear

the bird felt his wing brush a star

and heard the sweet song twinkle far

he opened his beak and sang along

drifting through the starlit song

a world of melody and grace

to earthbound beings, out of place

tinkling music off twinkling stars

against soft velvet space, stretching ever so far

Owl and Dragon- Two Tiny Hens

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Owl and Dragon, two chicks from this year.  Owl is a Welsummer and Dragon is an Orloff.

Dragon (despite the name) is very cuddly and naturally tame.  Owl is a little more energetic but is sweet, too.  The hen didn’t want them (see below) and because of her nasty pecking, they are now  under the brooder light.  Owl enjoys sleeping under Dragon and they are very attached; they call loudly when one is taken away from the other.

When the “big hens” see the chicks, they make “disapproving wing” at them – have you ever seen when hens see something they don’t like and drag one wing while informing the subject of their disapproval who’s in charge?  When the chicks see the hens, they run for cover- who wouldn’t be terrified after being pecked by a big, crabby broody hen?  The hen, however, continues to be very devoted to her eggs, sitting on them and clucking softly to them all day long.

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