Model Horse Experiment

This is another model horse scene I’m making (before photo edits).  It’s a draft horse dragging a log in front of a barn, but is not turning out exactly the way I wanted yet.  Maybe it needs a re-take in front of some trees.



Millie [Re-post]


“Millie, a bantam hen.  She is the smallest in the flock and has her own roost up high up in the coop where the other hens can’t fly up and peck her.  One year, she helped hatch three tiny ducklings.”

A reprint of my first-ever post!  (It was published in December of 2012!)

Making Waves Gets You What You Want

A new Katie Chronicles post!

The Katie Chronicles


Dear Katie, I am a 10 hand British-style Shetland pony. When it rains it pours.  It has been raining non-stop this winter, and the water is rising in my paddock.  I’d like to go on vacation.  What can I do?  Signed, Trying Not Make Waves

Dear Waves, Go ahead and make some waves.  The problem is that you are still in your paddock, a place no self-respecting Shetland should be.  Swim over to the fence, and go under, over or through it.  It won’t be hard- trust me.  You can find a scenic location with lots of grass and eat continuously until spring.  If they try to catch you–run.  – Katie

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Photo Editing (Abstract Art)

I was making a realistic model horse picture by editing a bunch of photos into the background, and cutting out the fence when I realized that it makes an interesting photo collage.  The fence will eventually end up behind the horse, but I like the surreal feeling it has right now.  The horse and rider are completely unedited, but the background is heavily Photoshopped.

Tick-Tock, Beaky, Duchess, and Clover

Tick-Tock, Beaky, Duchess, and Clover are Dutch Bantams.  They’re very pretty and sweet–and tiny.  Tick-Tock, the rooster, has an extremely shrill crow, but he doesn’t crow much except for when he sees the other rooster, Frizzy.  When it snowed for the first time this year, they didn’t like it.  They went back in their coop and wouldn’t come out for the rest of the day.




Duchess, a blue cream light brown hen.

Tick-Tock, Clover, and Duchess, with Beaky in front.  Tick-Tock is crowing.  The cardboard taped to the front of the coop was there to make the doorway smaller.

Feeding Horses: What Is a Forage?


Pasture, or grass, is a forage.

Forages contain a high crude-fiber content.  In general, a forage would be grass or hay.  Horses should be fed to horses because they provide nutrients.  But they don’t do just that.  Forage keeps up the muscle tone in the GI tract and provides horses with something to do.  Without forage, horses can develop bad habits such as stall weaving and wood-chewing.

According to Feeding and Care of the Horse, forages have the following characteristics:

They are bulky.

They high in fiber and low in digestible energy.

Forages are high in calcium and potassium and low in phosphorous. 

Sun-cured hays are higher in vitamins E, A, and K.

Vary in protein content.

Horses should have access to pasture in moderation.  But hay can be fed in larger amounts.  It is recommended that horses be fed many small meals throughout the day or else get their hay in a slow feeder to make it last longer.  This simulates natural grazing activity.


Hay should be fed in little bits to mimic natural grazing.