Collection of Very Old Posts

Equine Advice

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Gypsy, the Equine Encyclopedia, has something to say about the canter.  Like all shetlands, she is always watching, listening and learning.

The canter is a 3-beat gait that is faster than the trot and slower than the gallop.  The average length of stride is 10 to 25 feet (much shorter for 11.3 hand ponies) and the canter has a period of suspension (all feet off the ground at once).  It is about 12 miles per hour and takes a lot of effort, so ponies hate it and become tired very easily.

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Equine Advice

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Gypsy, the Equine Encyclopedia, has something to say about the joints of the fore limb; proximal to distal.  Like all shetlands, she is always watching, listening and learning.

Beginning at the top, there is the shoulder, the elbow, the kneethe fetlock, the pasternfetlock and coffin.  A horse who puts most of his weight on his front legs is called “on the forehand.”

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Equine Advice: Tying Up

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Gypsy, the Equine Encyclopedia, has something to say about Rhabdomyolysis.  Like all shetlands, she is always watching, learning and listening.

Rhabdomyolysis, also known as tying upMonday Morning Sickness or azoturia, is the destruction of muscle tissue which leads to a stiff gait, mainly in the hindquarters.

It is genetic, with dominant gene inheritance.  Equine Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy (EPSM), is a form of Rhabdomyolysis and is genetic.

Tying Up also can be caused by abrupt changes in exercise or failure to walk a horse out after hard work and earned the name “Monday Morning Sickness” because when horses were worked hard all week and given a day off, on Monday morning they would become stiff and “tie up”.

If a horse has tied up, it is best not to move him and to call the vet immediately.

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Equine Advice: the 5 Types Of Walk

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Gypsy, the Equine Encyclopedia, has something to say about the 5 types of walk that are asked for in dressage.  Like all shetlands, she is always watching, listening and learning. 

The 5 types of walk are the working walk, the collected walk, the free walk, themedium walk and the extended walk.

They may be asked for in dressage tests (dressage is an equestrian event in which horses are trained for collection and harmony with the rider; a dressage test is a competition where horses go around an arena one at a time following a pattern and the horses are judged on harmony, impulsion and collection).

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The walk is known as the “ideal form of locomotion.”

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Equine Advice: The Gallop

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Gypsy, the Equine Encyclopedia, has something to say about the gallop.  Like all shetlands, she is always watching, learning and listening.

The gallop is the horse’s fastest gait.  It is well known in horse racing and Quarter horses running a quarter-mile have clocked speeds up to 50 miles per hour.

At the gallop, some thoroughbred racehorses have stride lengths over 25 feet.  A more collected form of gallop, the Hand-Gallop is sometimes used in hutseat classes at horse shows.

The gallop is a 4-beat gait and horses have only one foot on the ground at a time with a long “period of suspension” (all feet off the ground).

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