Developing Dutch Eggs

The Dutch eggs got candled today (three of the twenty), and all three had chicks developing well.  I have another nine eggs in a new incubator with a turner (too soon to candle), and if all of them hatch, there will be twenty-nine Dutch chicks.  And a hen just decided to go broody, and is sitting on another 10+ eggs.  Luckily I have a plan for all the chicks, and none of them will be unwanted if they hatch (even the roosters).   The Dutch chicks Millie hatched are almost fully-feathered.  The little Cream is almost certainly a rooster (his name is Milford), and I think the Blue Cream’s a hen (her name’s Dutchy). 


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Hopefully more cute and healthy Dutch chicks!


 

Tick-Tock, Beaky, Duchess, and Clover

Tick-Tock, Beaky, Duchess, and Clover are Dutch Bantams.  They’re very pretty and sweet–and tiny.  Tick-Tock, the rooster, has an extremely shrill crow, but he doesn’t crow much except for when he sees the other rooster, Frizzy.  When it snowed for the first time this year, they didn’t like it.  They went back in their coop and wouldn’t come out for the rest of the day.

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Tick-Tock.

Duchess, a blue cream light brown hen.

Tick-Tock, Clover, and Duchess, with Beaky in front.  Tick-Tock is crowing.  The cardboard taped to the front of the coop was there to make the doorway smaller.

Favorite Chickens

My favorite kind of chicken is a Dutch Bantam.  They’re so tiny.  After owning and showing chickens for a long time, I wanted to find something really show-quality.  But who knew that Dutch Bantams were so rare and hard to find?

Apparently most of them have some other breed crossed in, like Old English Game Bantams or Bantam Leghorns.  This improves the birds’ color, but they’re no longer show-type.  Dutch Bantams are small, weighing only 18 to 21 ounces, and are supposed to be flighty but tamable.  The next challenge is finding birds in a standard color. Most of them seem to be non-APA-approved colors, like millie fleur or buff.

Old English Game Bantams are beautiful, look a lot like Dutch, and are less rare.  Mine is the sweetest little bird ever.  But there’s one problem: The roosters’ combs need to be cut off for show–not something I’m willing to do.  I don’t know if there is a such thing as a pure Dutch Bantam in America.  But if there is, I’m going to try to find it.