Meet Sparkles! (Blue Cream Light Brown Hen)

Sparkles is one of last year’s hatch of twelve chicks.  For some reason the eggs had an extremely low hatch rate last year, and a very high hatch rate this year.  She was hatched in an incubator, and raised in a brooder with four other incubator-hatched chicks.  Out of that hatch, there were two cockerels and three pullets.

She was the only Blue Cream Light Brown to hatch (out of that group), and she’s one of the sweetest chickens ever.  All the chicks grew up to be show-quality and extremely beautiful.  Sparkles is going to be shown this year, and her mother, Duchess, was 3rd out of 32 birds overall (large fowl and bantam), and best Single Comb Clean Legged bantam.  Her father, Tick-Tock, received a blue danish at both shows he attended.  Her brother, Bluesy, is a beautiful Blue Cream cockerel (hatched out of a different batch of eggs, and now at his new home).

Sparkles has tried to hatch eggs twice this year, and 100% of the Dutch hens have gone broody.  This breed seems to be very good at sitting on eggs and raising chicks.

Sparkles a few days ago (it’s hard to get a photo of her because she runs around so fast).


The incubator she hatched out of ^


Over the next few days, meet the rest of last year’s hatch!


For more Dutch Bantam posts and pictures, click the “Dutch Bantams” link under “Categories” in the sidebar!



Owly Grows Up

Owly is a Welsummer hen who was hatched in 2013.

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Owly with Dragon at six days old.

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Owly with Dragon at about two weeks old.

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Owly with her friend Snowball.

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Owly in the fall of 2013, when she began to grow giant spurs (which is highly unusual for a hen).

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Owly with the flock in 2015, at 2.5 years old.  She is now 3.25 years old.

What to Do If Your Chicken Dissapears


Panther, the missing chicken.


Last night, a chicken named Panther didn’t come back to the coop.  Maybe she was scared of the neighbors’ fireworks, which were being set off right next to the coop.  Or else she got eaten by an owl.  We searched all over and couldn’t find her–there are a lot of places that chickens can hide in.   All the others were in the coop asleep.  It was dark outside, so it was hard to look for her. Eventually, after a lot of worrying, we locked the coop and decided that Panther had either been eaten by a predator or was hiding somewhere.


Panther didn’t come back to the coop.


To read the rest of this post, visit my chicken website: http://www.bigthingscoop.com/2015/07/04/what-to-do-if-your-pet-chicken-dissapears/


“Thumps” in Horses

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Rhythmic movement of the flanks is an indicator of Thumps.


Synchronous Diaphramatic Flutter is a condition in which the horse’s flanks move in rhythm to the heart beat.  This is not a dangerous condition, and resting the horse will help it subside.  Thumps occurs after the horse undergoes stress.  Some situations include after an event where the horse is worked hard–such a showjumping–or colic.  Too much calcium in a horse’s diet can predispose it to Thumps.  Prevent Thumps by keeping the horse hydrated and giving electrolytes as needed.

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Keep you horse hydrated!



Developmental Orthopedic Diseases in Equids

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DOD usually occurs in larger, faster-growing breeds of horses.


 

The term “developmental orthopedic disease,” or DOD, encompasses all general growth disorders which result from abnormal bone growth.  So, what causes DOD?  It’s when the cartridge at the ends of bones fails to turn into bone when the horse stops growing, or under other circumstances.  It then becomes thicker and larger, interfering with the movement of the horse.

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DOD can adversely affect horses’ joints–and also their usefulness.


 

This disorder generally occurs in the fast-growing horse breeds, such as Thoroughbreds.  It may result in wobblers syndrome.  Horses that have wobblers generally have a lack of coordination, or ataxia.  It occurs in the cervical vertebrae, and can be treated–at least temporarily–by fusing the affected vertebrae in the neck.  The effects of DOD also encompass Physitis (enlarged growth plates), angular leg deformities, and joint cartilage damage.

Ponies are generally less at-risk.


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